The Study of Wellness and the Science of Success: Inspiring Change

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Of the many questions that concern health and wellness, from what it is to how to maintain it, from how to measure it to what it means to forgo it, one query matters most: How do you create a culture of wellness, where there is the inspiration to change, and the power to change by and from a voice of change?


The answer to that challenge rests with choosing a speaker, a professional who is energetic by nature and eloquent by inclination, who can go before a group of employees - who can, and will, stand before a workplace - and transform even the most reluctant individual, even the most cynical and skeptical person into a champion of exercise and nutrition.


To the extent there is a science to this method of success, and insofar as a speaker can move people by the power of his example and the poignancy of his story, I refer readers to Arman Sadeghi, Founder and President of Titanium Success, an expert involving neuroscience, time management, and personal health, among other things.


I cite Arman's background because, though I have no connection whatsoever to him, I recognize the necessity of what he offers. Rather, my connection is that of a reader and viewer of his work: In my review of the many speakers who claim to be authorities on health and wellness, but revert to platitudes and the catechisms of corporate lingo, Arman is the only one I would vouch for, the only author and lecturer I will endorse.


By having him talk to - no, by having him start a conversation with - employees, he can establish the credibility necessary to convince workers that good health is not some abstract concept, but an achievable - and impressive - reward. And therein lies the science of his approach to success: To speak with passion, yes, but to do so with the ease of a friend sharing stories among a gathering of intimates; to convey information with the zeal of a believer, because his sincerity is intense (in a good way) and unyielding, so he can earn the trust of his audience and the confidence of his listeners.


It is this sense of comfort that a top speaker offers, in addition to the independence he possesses and the insight he provides. Put another way, sometimes it takes an outsider - sometimes it takes a person free of the workaday issues of this or that company - to tell employees, "What you consider impossible is very much possible because, despite what you may think is improbable, is eminently probable. You can strengthen your health, and improve your outlook toward life in general and yourself in particular."


That attitude is the pathway to success. It promotes wellness without the perception of deceit or coercion. It promulgates a set of ideas while explaining how to fulfill them. It produces a plan, and details - with clarity and concision - how to honor it. The speaker is the icon of wellness.

About the Author

Michael D. Shaw is a columnist, biochemist and protegue of the late Willard Libby, the 1960 winner of the Nobel Prize in Chemistry. He writes about a variety of subjects including wellness, health care, and business leadership.