/ Technology / Artificial Intelligence, MD: Wellness for the Workplace

Artificial Intelligence, MD: Wellness for the Workplace

Lewis Fein

Artificial Intelligence (AI) is the new MD of corporate wellness. That is, artificial intelligence or machine learning—names and definitions differ, while no one differs about the distinction between conventional computing and autonomous technology—AI can now transcend its own coding to examine the code of life itself; identifying information that no person has the speed or accuracy to match, so all people can benefit from the way AI deconstructs the DNA of data, so business experts can review what was previously too hard to find and too much of a financial hardship to bear.

The men and women who analyze this data are at the forefront of a revolution in wellness. If that statement sounds too grandiose, if it seems more promotional than practical, I say: Look around you.

Look at the screen before you. Look at the glow of the glass, whose backlit display shines like the sheen of paper and has the polish of print. Look at the applications that monitor your movements and measure your heart rate. Look at the smartwatch on your wrist, which says more than any medical bracelet and is a fashion statement unto itself.

Look, too, at the business advisors—the engineers, educators, and economists, among others—who are true to their duty: to advise a business not by restating the obvious but by rendering the previously opaque obvious to a company and its workers.

According to Nick Chini of Bainbridge, the right business advisors can convert AI into significant ROI. They translate yet another code—the ones and zeros of digital content—into a strategy for improving the physical health of individual workers. They use content to advance a climate of contentment.

I agree with this strategy for two reasons.

First, data is indispensable to a multitude of industries, from investments and insurance to healthcare and hospitality, from marketing and advertising to technology and trade.

Data determines the information we receive, influencing how we live or why we live the way we do.

Secondly, interpreting data requires expertise.

An expert must be fluent in the nuances of technology, so he can transform the seemingly unintelligible into material that is easily accessible.

That access shows how a worker can lower his risk of heart disease, just as it can show an employer how to lower insurance costs without compromising the degree of coverage.

That access shows how AI helps a business expert, whose goal is to advise and earn the consent of employers and employees alike. For their consent is essential to honoring the spirit of personal health and corporate wellness.

That access shows how AI continues to reshape how a company encourages what it seeks to achieve: a healthier workforce, in mind and body, based on its acceptance of expert advice; based on the intelligence not only of a higher form of technology but of a heightened state about the stakes themselves, that we have a vital say in living better.

Let us accomplish this mission.

Let us elevate AI and sound business advice, too.

0 POST COMMENT

Send Us A Message Here

Your email address will not be published.

two × 5 =

Send this to a friend